While the experts may disagree on the benefits and health issues offered by fluoridated drinking water, the fact remains that lots of people do not want fluoride in their drinking water and want to know how to remove it and other potentially dangerous contaminants.

The following information (text) comes from the About.Com Chemistry Section.

Ways to Remove Fluoride from Water:

  • Reverse Osmosis Filtration — This is used to purify several types of bottled water (not all), so some bottled waters are unfluoridated. Reverse osmosis systems are generally unaffordable for personal use.
  • Activated Alumina Defluoridation Filter — These filters are used in locales where fluorosis is prevalent. They are relatively expensive (lowest price I saw was $30/filter) and require frequent replacement, but do offer an option for home water filtration.
  • Distillation Filtration — There are commercially available distillation filters that can be purchased to remove fluoride from water. On a related note: When looking at bottled water, keep in mind that ‘distilled water’ does not imply that a product is suitable for drinking water and other undesirable impurities may be present.

    These Methods Do NOT Remove Fluoride:

  • Brita, Pur, and most other filters — Some websites about fluoride removal state otherwise, but I checked the product descriptions on the companies’ websites to confirm that fluoride is left in the water.
  • Boiling Water — This will concentrate the fluoride rather than reduce it.
  • Freezing Water — Freezing water does not affect the concentration of fluoride.
  • Before investing in a fluoride removal system, or any other water filtration system, you will want to have your water tested to see what contaminants your water contains. We always suggest using a certified water testing laboratory for this sort of thing but for those wishing to do water quality testing on their own, we suggest using a Water Testing Meter such as the eXact Micro 7+ which can test for many different critical water quality parameters and not just fluoride.

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